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Why Choose Thomson?

THREE FULLY SUPPORTED DAILY RIDES

Yes, that's correct! 3 fully supported rides each day - from 20km to 130km (12 miles to 80 miles). No matter your fitness level, our extensive ride programme has you covered. Perfect for couples who love to ride but have different fitness levels. Only with Thomson!

VIP ACCESS TO STAGES

When we say VIP access, we mean it. Stage Starts and Finishes, unique rides over the Finish Line & photo ops on the Official Podium.

TOP HOTELS

The premier hotel in Alpe d’Huez, the top hotel for cyclists in the Pyrenees, luxurious spa and wellness hotel in Andorra

PRIVATE HOSPITALITY MARQUEES

Experience the Tour de France LIVE on the mountain from our Private Marquees, strategically situated on the key climbs, with food, drinks, and satellite TV race coverage.

ASO PREMIUM STATUS

We're the Premier Official Tour de France Tour Operator - awarded Premium status by ASO.

THE BEST SUPPORT TEAMS

Our support teams are the envy of the mountain. The best support guaranteed.

MORE KOMS

Alpe d’Huez, Ventoux, Galibier, Croix de Fer, Tourmalet, Portet, Luz-Ardiden, Port de Bales and many more. No-one rides like Thomson!

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Amazing trip ! The staff is incredible and agenda was so much fun . My expectations were high and Thomson bike tours exceeded all expectations ...

Scott McIntyre, USA — 2016

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Simply outstanding! Thomson created the Alpine riding experience I had been looking for - challenging courses with unpararreled support. The guide-to-rider ratio was spot-on! The ...

Brian Davis, USA — 2017

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Thomson Tours owns the ride for the cycling enthusiast. Each and every day was like a Four Seasons Resort on the road. The Pyrenees set ...

Wade Pannell, USA — 2017

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2021 Tour de France

With the perfect mix of race-viewing and riding, our 4 KOM trips cover the highlights of the 2021 Tour de France.


Which 2021 Tour de France stages can you see?

Stage Date Start and finish Distance Terrain Race viewing
24.06 Team Presentation
25.06
1 26.06 Brest — Landerneau Hilly Yes
2 27.06 Perros-Guirec — Mûr-de-Bretagne Hilly Yes
3 28.06 Lorient — Pontivy Flat Yes
4 29.06 Redon — Fougères Flat
5 30.06 Changé — Laval (TT) TT
6 01.07 Tours — Châteauroux Flat
7 02.07 Vierzon — Le Creusot Hilly
8 03.07 Oyonnax — Le Grand-Bornand Mountain
9 04.07 Cluses — Tignes Mountain Yes
05.07 Rest Day
10 06.07 Albertville — Valence Flat Yes
11 07.07 Sorgues — Malaucène Mountain Yes
12 08.07 St-Paul-Trois-Châteaux — Nîmes Flat Yes
13 09.07 Nîmes — Carcassonne Flat
14 10.07 Carcassonne — Quillan Hilly
15 11.07 Céret — Andorra La Vella Mountain Yes
12.07 Rest Day
16 13.07 Pas de la Casa — St Gaudens Hilly Yes
17 14.07 Muret — Col de Portet Mountain Yes
18 15.07 Pau — Luz-Ardiden Mountain Yes
19 16.07 Mourenx — Libourne Flat Yes
20 17.07 Libourne — Saint-Emilion (TT) TT
21 18.07 Chatou — Paris Champs-Élysées Flat Yes

Stage Detail

Stage 1

Brest > Landerneau


Distance

Terrain

Hilly


In a post card type scenery, going through Locronan and Quimper, this first day will offer no respite. The never ending accelerations due to the frequent changes in direction, the windy parts in the Monts d'Arrée and a finish at the top of 3-km hill at an average 5.7% (including parts at 14%) will crown one hell of a puncher.


Stage 1

Brest > Landerneau

Cote de la Fosse aux Loups

Details
Climbs

Stage 2

Perros-Guirec > Mûr-de-Bretagne


Distance

Terrain

Hilly


The first part of the race will allow the riders to appreciate the wild and unique beauty of the Côte de Granit rose. The route then heads inland towards a mouthwatering final section: the double climb up the Côte de Mûr-de-Bretagne. The Mûr will be an unforgiving judge, especially since the riders will start the climb almost from a standstill, unlike the previous year when momentum saw them through the first part of the climb.


Stage 2

Perros-Guirec > Mûr-de-Bretagne

Mur de Bretagne

Details
Climbs

Stage 3

Lorient > Pontivy


Distance

Terrain

Flat


Warren Barguil, best climber of the 2017 Tour should have all eyes on him as he takes off from his birthplace. Unfortunately he won't be in the spotlights at the finish: at the Château des Rohan the sprinters certainly won’t miss out on this first opportunity to express themselves.


Stage 3

Lorient > Pontivy

Details
Climbs

Stage 4

Redon > Fougères


Distance

Terrain

Flat


This journey through Argoat, the beautiful inland Brittany entirely set in the Gallo country and going from one side to the other of the Ille-et-Vilaine area is another fine opportunity for the sprinters. Unless if audacious riders make the best of the hilly forrest roads or windy conditions on the few unsheltered uplands to remain clear of the hungry pack.


Stage 4

Redon > Fougères

Details
Climbs

Stage 5

Changé > Laval (TT)


Distance

Terrain

TT


The first week of the Tour hadn’t offered such a long individual time-trial since 2008, year of the last Grand Départ in… Brest! Geography commanded to break an eventual litany of flat stages and this gift to the time-trial specialists shows our will to vary the scenario and reshuffle the established positions.


Stage 5

Changé > Laval (TT)

Details
Climbs

Stage 6

Tours > Châteauroux


Distance

Terrain

Flat


A brief stage in two parts. A touch of sweetness and wonder first going by the splendid Renaissance castles, uncomparable gems of the Val de Loire heritage. Power then when the teams protecting the interests of their sprinters will increase the pace to reach the finish.


Stage 6

Tours > Châteauroux

Details
Climbs

Stage 7

Vierzon > Le Creusot


Distance

Terrain

Hilly


The following day of a “sprint-course”, the Tour will vary the pleasures offering its longest stage for 21 years. But length doesn’t mean languor: all along another cultural journey (Bourges, Nevers, Bibracte, Autun…), the Morvan will offer 3,000 m of elevation to the menu and a spicy finish up the demanding Signal d’Uchon on the course of the Tour for the very first time.


Stage 7

Vierzon > Le Creusot

Signal d'Uchon

Details
Climbs

Stage 8

Oyonnax > Le Grand-Bornand


Distance

Terrain

Mountain


After 2009 and 2018, the finish at Le Grand-Bornand will once again be conditioned by the Romme – Colombière climbing sequence. But this time it’ll be preceded by the climb up to Mont-Saxonnex (5,7 km at 8,3%) first ascent towards the Plateau de Solaison, and will therefore offer a triple climb on a distance of over 20 kms at close to 9%. Of course it’ll be a day for the best climbers!


Stage 8

Oyonnax > Le Grand-Bornand

Col de Romme & Col de la Colombiere

Details
Profile
Climbs

Stage 9

Cluses > Tignes


Distance

Terrain

Mountain


We had promised that we would rapidly return to Tignes to erase the frustration of the missed rendez-vous of 2019. The Tour will respect its word by going up the Col du Pré for the second time and of course the majestic Cormet de Roselend before heading up the long final ascent that sneaks up under the dam all the way to the Val Claret.


Stage 9

Cluses > Tignes

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Col du Pré & Cormet de Roselend

Tignes

Details
Profile
Climbs

Stage 10

Albertville > Valence


Distance

Terrain

Flat


At the footstep of the Savoie resorts, the quality of its infrastructures and its welcoming atmosphere makes Albertville the perfect host city. But this time, the doorway to the Alps will not send the riders towards the summits. By heading to the valleys of Isère and of the Rhone, the course is clearly made for an explanation between the sprinters.


Stage 10

Albertville > Valence

Details
Climbs

Stage 11

Sorgues > Malaucène


Distance

Terrain

Mountain


Five years after a windy visit, the Tour returns to the Giant of Provence that has become a Regional Natural Parc, for a double climb (including the almost unprecedented one going through Sault) and a finish at the bottom. A fine way to salute the initiative of the Conseil départemental of Vaucluse that refurnished the summit road for cyclists.


Stage 11

Sorgues > Malaucène

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Mont Ventoux from Sault

Mont Ventoux from Bedoin

Details
Profile
Climbs

Stage 12

St-Paul-Trois-Châteaux > Nîmes


Distance

Terrain

Flat


After a journey along the magical Gorges de l’Ardèche that will for the first time be entirely visited by the Tour, this stage should end with a bunched sprint in Nîmes, like in 2019 with a similar finish. One will however have to be extra careful: the wind could be a key factor on wide open roads and echelons could occur.


Stage 12

St-Paul-Trois-Châteaux > Nîmes

Details
Climbs

Stage 13

Nîmes > Carcassonne


Distance

Terrain

Flat


From the Roman arenas that are considered as the most well preserved in the world to the medieval city part of the UNESCO world heritage, this stage will follow the course of history. It also tells us that despite what the geography seems to suggest, never has a finish by the Carcassonne towers finished with a bunched sprint. Good news for the audacious!


Stage 13

Nîmes > Carcassonne

Details
Climbs

Stage 14

Carcassonne > Quillan


Distance

Terrain

Hilly


Rather calm until Lavelanet, the journey into the Pyrenees rapidly becomes a roller-coaster ride as of Montségur: the citadel of vertigo and its rough climbs, then the Col de la Croix des Morts and Col de Saint-Louis that the riders will reach by riding on the spectacular Viaduc de l'Escargot, will sharpen the appetite of the hungriest climbers.


Stage 14

Carcassonne > Quillan

Details
Profile
Climbs

Stage 15

Céret > Andorra La Vella


Distance

Terrain

Mountain


A start in Céret for the first ever time, a first stop in the Pyrénées-Orientales area since 2009 and Thomas Voeckler’s victory in Perpignan, a journey through Prades, Font-Romeu, the col de Puymorens, the Port d'Envalira and Beixalis with slopes that are as tough to climb as they are tricky to descend: the Principality will crown a real king of the mountains.


Stage 15

Céret > Andorra La Vella

Details
Profile
Climbs

Stage 16

Pas de la Casa > St Gaudens


Distance

Terrain

Hilly


The Yellow Jersey contenders could enjoy a moment of truce and the hilly stage profile seems to favour breakaway riders who will still be fresh enough in this third week of racing. They will have to shake up the race if they don’t want to miss out on one of the last clear opportunities of shining.


Stage 16

Pas de la Casa > St Gaudens

Details
Climbs

Stage 17

Muret > Col de Portet


Distance

Terrain

Mountain


The Tour resumes from the bottom of the Pyrenees to face them differently with this stage that has two faces, with a big chain ring on over 100 kilometres before taking on three major obstacles in a row: Peyresourde, Val Louron-Azet and to finish off, the 16-km climb at an average gradient close to 9% of the unforgiving Col du Portet. Big efforts required for what promises to be quite a show.


Stage 17

Muret > Col de Portet

Col du Portet

Details
Profile
Climbs

Stage 18

Pau > Luz-Ardiden


Distance

Terrain

Mountain


Dense, tense, selective with the climbs up two giants of the Pyrenees: the Tourmalet and Luz Ardiden, where the verdict of the final mountain battle will be known. The climbing type leaders will have to find a way to gain enough time in the GC on those who are better in time-trials.


Stage 18

Pau > Luz-Ardiden

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Col du Tourmalet

Luz-Ardiden

Details
Climbs

Stage 19

Mourenx > Libourne


Distance

Terrain

Flat


On the traditional “Landes stage”, one logically predicts a bunched sprint based on the number of sprinters still in the race after surviving the mountains. But will they be able to master the events and circumstances? Redesigned and coming after three weeks of racing, it could also suit a courageous adventurer.


Stage 19

Mourenx > Libourne

Details
Climbs

Stage 20

Libourne > Saint-Emilion (TT)


Distance

Terrain

TT


The prestigious vineyard setting will make the athletic performance all the more impressive and will remind many of the Bordeaux-Pauillac time-trial in 2010 when Fabian Cancellara had beaten Tony Martin by 17 seconds. And drama should be well present on the day as the end of Tour time-trials have that vocation to decide who will conquer that final Yellow Jersey.


Stage 20

Libourne > Saint-Emilion (TT)

Details
Climbs

Stage 21

Chatou > Paris Champs-Élysées


Distance

Terrain

Flat


Chatou is the happy “chosen one” for this fourth consecutive start of the final stage in the department of the Yvelines that will carry on doing so until 2023. The Yvelines has become a land of cycling, it has indeed welcomed the start of Paris-Nice for ten years now and will be hosting the discipline (road, track, mountain bike and BMX) for the 2024 Olympic Games in Paris.


Stage 21

Chatou > Paris Champs-Élysées

Details
Climbs
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